Pool safety

Splashing around the swimming pool is a great way to have fun but please remember to make safety your priority to protect your children and others around the water – anyone can have a water-related accident – even children and adults who know how to swim. Here are some useful tips to help you and your little ones stay safe:

  • Ensure that you shower before entering the pool to help us maintain the water quality.
  • Avoid swimming if you have stomach problems or diarrhea.
  • Make sure that infants and toddlers wear swimming diapers and take bathroom breaks often. Contaminated pools take at least two days for cleaning and disinfecting.
  • Never let children swim alone, always designate swimming buddies or ensure an adult supervises them.
  • Avoid the use of large-sized inflatables and floats as they can obstruct your view of children in the pool.
  • Never – even for a moment – leave babies or children alone or in the care of another child, while in or near pools, spas, or wading pools – or near bath tubs, lakes, irrigation ditches or other open bodies of water.
  • Remember, an infant can drown in just one inch of water – so make sure the supervising adult is always within arm’s length of the child with their full attention focused on them at all times.
  • The supervising adult should not be engaged in distracting activities, such as talking on a telephone, socialising or tending to household chores.
  • Home swimming pools should be enclosed by a fence that prevents a child from climbing over or creeping through to access the pool.
  • Pool fences should be at least 1.2 metres high and should not have more than a 100mm gap at the bottom or through the vertical bars.
  • Any horizontal bars should have a minimum gap of 900 mm.
  • It is recommended that all gates are fitted with a self-closing hinge.
  • Check the integrity of the pool fencing and gates regularly – children will find the most unassuming ways to get into water so take extra care to ensure the safety of our future!
  • Parents, caregivers and pool owners should learn CPR or BLS (Basic Life Support) and store a safety ring with a rope beside the pool.
  • Ensure there is always a phone within easy access of the pool area.
  • Supervising adults should make sure they do not leave any pool toys in the water as a child could fall in while trying to retrieve them.
  • Toddlers, youngsters with an intellectual disability and children with seizure disorders are particularly vulnerable to drowning, but all youngsters are in danger if unsupervised in or near water.
  • Even a child who knows how to swim may drown a few feet from safety.
  • Consuming alcohol at a public swimming pool is against the law.
  • Getting into a swimming pool having consumed alcohol is not only a risk to you; it could be a risk to others, so refrain from consuming alcohol and using a pool.
  • Remember, children should be supervised at all times.